mind body spirit

A BEHAVIORAL HEALTH TRAINING FOR SPIRITUAL LEADERS

A Behavioral Health Training for Spiritual Leaders:

Empowered with the appropriate tools the church can serve as a powerful vehicle for promoting emotional wellbeing.  According to the NAMI website “one in four adults−approximately 61.5 million Americans− will experience mental illness in a given year.”

According to the mental health ministries website, “A majority of individuals with a mental health issue go first to a spiritual leader for help.”  Therefore, training Spiritual leaders to identify mental health needs and to make the appropriate referral; just makes for good church practice.  A member will have a “better” long term outcome if they are counseled by a Spiritual leader with a basic understanding of: 1) human behavior, 2) mindfulness, 3) a mental health crisis, 4) mental health resources and process for referrals, 5) value of self-care, self-regulation and self-awareness.

 

 

 

“In the mystery of attentive presence to others, the guest becomes the host in the presence of God. In the hospitality of genuine encounter with the other, we come face to face with the mystery of God who is between us as both the One offered and the One who offers.”

Intertwined counseling ministries are offering behavioral health training for clergy and lay leaders.  The goal of the training is to enhance leadership’s ability to service the whole member- mind, body and Spirit; while simultaneously promoting self-awareness, self-care and self-regulation. Our training has a unique component, we integrate scripture into our mental health training; grounding mental health concepts into a familiar context.

Training Objectives:

  1. Empower Spiritual leaders with self-care and self-regulation skills
  2. Teach the skill of validation and “the art of listening"
  3. Partner with leaders to remove any barriers for members needing psychological services
  4. Increase Spiritual leaders confidence in their ability to respond to a mental health crisis
  5. For clergy and lay leaders to have a basic understanding of mental health and the confidence to make the appropriate referrals